Helping Your Employees with Occupational Illnesses

Employers take many measures to make sure their workplace is as safe as possible.  Keeping the workplace free from hazards is an essential step to keeping your customers and employees safe.  When making your business safe, you likely think about dangers such as a slippery floor or heavy machinery with outdated safety updates.  Unfortunately, many employers overlook the very real danger posed by occupational illnesses.  These include conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome, ulcers, or back injuries.  Conscientious employers should take measures to help their employees avoid occupational illnesses.  As an employer, there are measures you can and should take to help your employees avoid and deal with their occupational illnesses.

One of the best ways to identify and avoid occupational illnesses for your employees is to create an injury and illness prevention program.  The focus of an injury and illness program is to identify potential sources of injuries, and then making a plan to help manage and control those dangers.  For example, if your business requires employees to perform repetitive motions, such as lifting boxes and turning to put them away, an illness and injury program can help provide training to employees on how to properly lift boxes to avoid injuries as well as making sure employees take breaks at regular intervals.

Another way to help your employees is to provide information and awareness information about occupational illnesses.  While employees are likely aware of the dangers of carpal tunnel or even repetitive motion injuries, they may be less familiar with how to prevent other injuries, such as developing asthma or even certain psychological injuries.

Encouraging your employees to stay healthy and take appropriate breaks from work can also help to reduce the incidences of occupational illnesses.  Keeping your employees healthy and fit can help keep them strong, making it less likely they will develop those injuries.  Breaks are also extremely important.  For example, taking regular breaks from typing can reduce the chances of an employee developing carpal tunnel or exacerbating prior nerve damage.  Although some employers may feel frustrated at frequent breaks, making sure the employee never develops the injury in the first place will save time in the long run, as the employee will not need to miss work for treatment of the injury.

If you have questions about what measures you should take as an employer, contact us today.  We can talk to you about your rights and responsibilities

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