Social Security and Workers’ Compensation

In California, as well as across the nation, employees sustain work-related injury every day. When this happens, employees may be eligible to file a claim for workers’ compensation against their employer in order to pay for the medical costs associated with their injury, as well as some other stipends in some situations. California employers are required by law to carry workers’ compensation insurance in order to make sure that workers are adequately compensated when they sustain qualifying work-related injuries. Workers’ compensation provides an alternative to litigation and help to streamline the process, and by operating outside of the traditional court system, prevents the courts from having dockets clogged with workers’ compensation issues.

Social Security disability is a separate system, although it also is designed to assist people who are unable to work. The essential difference between Social Security disability benefits and worker’ compensation is that workers’ compensation is designed to provide compensation for work-related injuries. An individual who is injured outside of his or her employment may not receive compensation under workers’ compensation. Conversely, Social Security disability may allow an individual to seek to make up for lost income when he or she has an injury or illness that occurred outside of employment but still prevents the individual from working.

There are some occasions wherein a person may apply for and receive both workers’ compensation benefits and Social Security disability benefits. The first requirement is that you must be injured or expect to be injured for at least a year plus a day. A worker who has a terminal illness could also qualify. An injured worker must also have paid in to the Social Security system for a minimum amount of time, which is typically at least ten years. In such a situation, an injured worker could potentially receive both types of benefits at the same time. It should be noted, however, that the amount an injured employee receives through Social Security may be at least partially reduced by the amount received through workers’ compensation. This is different than unemployment benefits, as typically an injured worker may not draw both unemployment benefits and workers’ compensation at the same time.

 If you have questions about how to make your workplace safer and safety committees, contact me today at (714) 516-8188. We can talk about protecting your employees from injury, and your business from future litigation.

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