Exclusivity Rule

Every employer takes all precautions possible to prevent any type of injury from occurring in the work place.  Unfortunately, sometimes even the most cautious and meticulous of employers cannot prevent all injuries to its workers. When this happens, the employee who has incurred a work-related injury may file for compensation under workers’ compensation provisions of California law.  In some rare cases, however, employees who have sustained work-related injuries may attempt to recover damages through other means, other than workers’ compensation.  The California Labor Code and associated case law has strict provisions about when such a course of action may be permissible.

California Labor Code section 3600 contains the statute that codifies what is colloquially known as the “Workers’ Compensation Exclusivity Rule.”  The exclusivity rule provides that the workers’ compensation system is the exclusive method by which the employee may recover for a work-related injury, as long as this injury is incurred during the course and scope of the employee’s employment.  The workers’ compensation system is a no-fault system.  This means that an injured employee does not have to prove that an employer is responsible for the injury, only that the injury occurred during work and in the scope of employment.  However, in a civil case brought in a traditional court room, an employee would be required to prove fault, or at least negligence.  The trade-off is that in the workers’ compensation system, the injured worker is limited in the amount and type of damages that he or she may request or be awarded.  However, in a tort suit (meaning the type of suit that is brought in a “traditional” court room), an injured worker could ask for a larger variety of damages, including medical expenses, lost wages, lost capacity, and loss of household services, in addition to the damages that could be alleged by the spouse of the injured employee.

However, the exclusivity rule prevents an injured worker from seeking to bring a civil suit against an employer at the same time that he or she brings a workers’ compensation suit.  In other words, injured employers are prevented from bringing a workers’ compensation suit in addition to a civil suit.  There are exceptions to the exclusivity rule, though.  These exceptions include such issues as employer assault, fraud, and an uninsured employer.  If an exception applies, though, there are still rules that apply to prevent an employee from receiving a double recovery.

If you have questions about the exclusivity rule or other issues relating to how an employee may recover against his or her employer, contact us today at (714) 252-7078.

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