Why Do We Have Workers’ Compensation and How Does it Benefit My Business?

The workers’ compensation system is firmly entrenched in both federal and state laws in the United States. At its core, workers’ compensation is a form of protection afforded to the employee to make sure that he or she receives compensation for a work-related injury. The first employer liability laws were passed in the United States in 1855, and by 1949, every state had created and enacted its own workers’ compensation statutes. The first employer liability statutes made it possible for an employee to sue the employer for injuries resulting from the employer’s negligent or intentional conduct. Today, workers’ compensation is a “no fault” system. This means that the employee is not required to prove any negligence on the employer’s part before being entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. Although it seems at first glance like it might not be “fair” that an employee does not have to prove the injury was a result of wrongful conduct by an employer, this can actually benefit your business. Having to prove fault can make a case last much longer and make it much more complicated. Protracted litigation is not good for your business, so removing the negligence issue can greatly benefit an employer. Workers’ compensation also means that the employee relinquishes the right to sue the employer. An injured employee may file a claim for workers’ compensation to receive medical treatment and, in some cases, salary replacement. In exchange, however, the employee cannot then also file a law suit. This keeps the employee from being able to “double dip,” meaning he or she cannot get paid twice for the same injury. This provision is good for your business because, again, it will help keep you out of court. If you do end up in a workers’ compensation dispute, California has a special court system set up for workers’ compensation, which helps to speed the process. Workers’ compensation will also benefit your business because it provides a powerful incentive to make sure your employees are properly trained and safe. It also encourages the frequent review and revision of safety protocols, and hopefully reduces the number of injuries suffered by your employees.

If you have questions about workers’ compensation and your business, contact me today at (714) 516-8188. I can help walk you through the process and answer your questions about your business.

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