Rescinding a Workers’ Compensation Policy

Employers in California are required by statute to carry workers’ compensation insurance for all of their employees, with only a few, limited exceptions. Failure to carry insurance can result in severe penalties for an employer, and can easily climb into tens of thousands of dollars. Premiums for this insurance are also costly, however, and some employers attempt to keep that cost down by not being completely honest with the insurance company. Employers have been found to lie about the number of employees, the nature of the business, or the location of the work performed, all in an effort to cut the cost of the insurance premium. If the insurance company then discovers the fraud, it can cancel the insurance policy. In Southern Insurance Co. vs. Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board, EJ Distribution Corp. et al., the issue of rescinding an insurance policy for a trucking company was at issue.

In that case, the workers’ compensation insurance company issued a policy to EJ Distribution Corp. The application for insurance incorrectly indicated that the employees would not travel outside the state of California or  farther than 200 miles from the business. Later that same year, a worker injured his back while in Tennessee and performing work for the employer. The next month, the worker filed for workers’ compensation and the employer filed a claim with the insurance company. In June, the insurance company notified the employer that they would be rescinding the insurance policy based on the material misrepresentation made by the employer in that it failed to state that its employees were actually long-haul truckers. The insurer applied this rescission retroactively, returned the policy premiums paid to that date, and cancelled the policy going forward. The employer and insurer submitted to mandatory arbitration. The arbitrator determined the insurer could not retroactively rescind the policy, based on some ambiguities in the state statutes. The WCAB disagreed. It determined that California’s insurance code does provide for rescission of policies and the law makes no exception for workers’ compensation policies. The court determined that there was evidence that the employer made knowing misrepresentations to the insurer, but there was not a decision about whether the misrepresentations were material, which is required for rescission to be the appropriate remedy. The WCAB sent the matter back to arbitration to make the determination

The workers’ compensation system has many important requirements for employers. Call us today at (714) 516-8188 and let us talk with you about your business and what you need to do to make sure you are in compliance.

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