Hotel Cleaning Firm Charged with Workers’ Compensation Fraud

There have been many recent attempts and moves by California lawmakers to crack down on workers’ compensation fraud. Harsher penalties, new investigatory bodies, and restrictions on who may participate in the workers’ compensation medical system are all examples of recent and important steps that legislators have taken to reduce fraud and its attendant burden on the California legal system and tax payers. Fraud can come in many forms, including failure to report all of the employees to insurance carriers. In 2015, a case occurred which really highlights the fact that addressing fraud is an essential goal for California lawmakers.

In this case, a married couple, the Kwons, owned a business called Good Neighbor Services. The business had offices in San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego, as well as in Nevada and Georgia. The company was engaged in providing cleaning services to big-name hotels, such as the Ritz, Omni, Marriott, and Sheraton. However, the Kwons were not following the requirements of California workers’ compensation law. They were accused of concealing the existence of at least 800 employees. The purpose of this law was not only to avoid paying payroll taxes, but also to avoid carrying workers’ compensation insurance for all these people. They were further accused of threatening to fire any employee who was injured on the job. The grand jury ultimately indicted both of them, and they faced up to thirty one years in prison if convicted of all of the charges.

At the end of December 2015, the husband of the team pleaded guilty to seven felonies. These included insurance premium fraud, tax fraud, as well as involvement in a scheme that was constructed to avoid paying premiums and employment taxes. He stipulated to serving an eight year prison sentence, and also to paying restitution in excess of five million dollars.

In December 2016, Ms. Kwon also pleaded guilty. She pleaded guilty to two counts of premium fraud and two counts of employment tax fraud. Her prison sentence was four years and eight months. She also had to pay restitution in excess of five million dollars. This restitution went to both insurance carriers and the Employment Development Department.

 

Workers’ compensation fraud is a serious crime and carries justifiably heavy penalties. If you are an employer and have questions about your obligations under California law, call me today at (714) 516-8188. We can discuss your business and your future.

Ratings and Reviews

CBLS