What Violates 132(a)?

California Labor Code 132(a) clearly states that the policy behind this section is that there should not be discrimination against employees who are injured at work. The code goes on to outline that any employer who takes adverse action against an employee due to the employee making a workers’ compensation claim is subject to both civil and criminal penalties. These penalties can be severe, and it is important to have a firm grasp of what does and does not violate the terms of section 132(a).

The most obvious type of violation is where an employer takes direct adverse action that is discriminatory. An employer will expressly violate the statute if the employer terminates or threatens to terminate the employment of an employee because the employee has filed or expressed the intention to file a workers’ compensation claim, the employee receives an award for a workers’ compensation claim, or testified before the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board for another employee’s claim. The employer will also have expressly violated this section for discriminating against the employee in any way for these same reasons. Discriminatory action can include such actions are not limited to termination; they can also include other adverse actions, such as changing a shift to hours the employer knows the employee cannot work. The law also covers other discriminatory acts by the employer, such as when an employee is penalized for being injured on the job or from missing time from their job due to an injury sustained in the workplace.

Insurers are also included in prohibitions under 132(a). An insurer may not tell an employer to terminate the employee because an employee has filed for workers’ compensation benefits, received an award of workers’ compensation benefits, or testified before the WCAB for another employee’s workers’ compensation claim. Under this section, an insurer is prohibited from telling an employer to fire an employee when that is coupled with a threat to cancel a workers’ compensation insurance police, to raise the insurance premium, or other adverse action against the employer.

These cases are typically filed in conjunction with an underlying workers’ compensation claim. The employee must do more than simply allege that they suffered adverse consequences from the employer. The employee must also prove that they suffered these adverse actions because of their workers’ compensation claim.

It is very important to protect your company from potential claims under 132(a), as a successful suit can be very financially damaging or even fatal to your business. If your business is facing a suit under 132(a), contact me today at (714) 516-8188 to discuss it.

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